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Ted French

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Excel’s Format Painter

Wednesday April 23, 2014

One of the features I really like in Excel, and one that I use frequently is the format painter. My affection for this feature stems from how easy it is to use, and how quickly it allows you to add formatting options to a spreadsheet.

What format painter allows you to do is, with the single click of the icon, copy all the formatting options from one cell and paste them into another cell or cells in a spreadsheet. The cells don't even need to be adjacent to each other when you do this.

To find out about using this feature, read the article on Excel's Format Painter.

Related Tutorials

Insert a Watermark in Excel

Monday April 21, 2014
Insert a Watermark in Excel
Insert a Watermark in Excel
© Ted French

Excel does not include a true watermark feature, but you can approximate a visible watermark by inserting an image file into a header or footer of a worksheet.

In visible watermarking, the information is typically text or a logo which identifies the owner or marks the media in some way.

Since headers and footers are normally displayed on every page of a workbook, this method of watermarking is an easy way to ensure that a logo or other necessary information is present on all pages.

To find out all the details read this short tutorial on how to Insert a Watermark in Excel.

Other Formatting Tutorials

Excel SUM OFFSET Formula

Saturday April 19, 2014
By combining the SUM function with the OFFSET function we can create a lookup formula that uses a dynamic range to incorporate new data as it is added to the worksheet.

The SUM function, by itself, will usually accommodate inserted cells of data with one exception - when the data is inserted into the cell where the function is currently located.

By using the SUM and OFFSET functions together, however, the range that is totaled becomes dynamic. Or, in other words, it changes to accommodate new cells of data. The addition of new cells of data does not cause problems because the range continues to adjust as each new cell is added.

To find out all the details, read this tutorial on the Excel SUM OFFSET Formula

Related Tutorials

Sum Cells with SUMPRODUCT

Thursday April 17, 2014

In addition to counting cells that meet multiple conditions set by the user, the SUMPRODUCT function can also sum the contents of those cells.

Even though Excel has the better known SUMIF and SUMIFS functions to add up values that meet one or more conditions, SUMPRODUCT still has its uses.

One such use is summing the data in cells that fall between two values.

For more information, read this short tutorial on how to Sum Cells between Two Values with SUMPRODUCT.

Related Tutorials

Counting with SUMPRODUCT

Tuesday April 15, 2014
Count Cells with SUMPRODUCT
Count Cells with SUMPRODUCT
© Ted French

SUMPRODUCT is one of Excel's more unique functions.

For one, it is undocumented, which means it does not get listed with other functions, nor does it provide users with the dialog box option for filling in the function's arguments.

Second, in addition to its normal job of adding together the results of multiple multiplication operations, it can also be used to count up the number of cells in a range that meet specific criteria.

To find out more, read this short tutorial on how to Count Cells between Two Values with SUMPRODUCT.

Related Tutorials

Excel RADIANS Function

Saturday April 12, 2014

Excel has a number of functions that can help you carry out basic trigonometry operations such as finding the tangent or cosine of an angle.

The only problem is that these functions require that angles be measured in radians.

Since most of us measures angles in degrees, Excel has a function that converts these degree measurements to radians.

In doing so, Excel makes using its trig functions as is easy as Pi.

To find out all the details on using this handy function, read the tutorial on the Excel RADIANS Function.

Related Tutorials

Excel COS Function

Wednesday April 9, 2014

Another of Excel's trigonometric functions includes the COS function which is used to find the cosine of an angle.

Trigonometry has application in a number of fields including astronomy, physics, engineering, and surveying.

In particular, the uses for the cosine of an angle include modeling such things as sound and light waves.

To find out all the details of using this function, read this tutorial on the Excel COS Function.

Related Articles

Find the Sine of an Angle in Excel

Monday April 7, 2014
Excel SIN Function
Excel SIN Function
© Ted French
Excel's list of math functions includes a number of the most common trigonometric functions.

Trigonometry has application in a number of fields including astronomy, physics, engineering, and surveying.

One of the trigonometric functions in Excel is the SIN function which gives you the sine of an angle measured in radians.

To find out all the details on how this is done, read this tutorial on the Excel SIN Function.

Related Tutorials

Calculate Weighted Average in Excel

Thursday April 3, 2014

The AVERAGE Function is handy to know and one that I, as a teacher, use frequently.

However, when it comes to student marks, rather than finding the average I often want to find a weighted average.

As the name suggests, a weighted average places more weight or value on certain elements - such as exams - than on other elements being averaged.

In addition to marking, the weighted average can be used anywhere where you need to find the average for data of unequal value.

To find out all the details, read this short tutorial on Calculating the Weighted Average in Excel.

Related Tutorials

Ignore Zeros when Finding the Average

Tuesday April 1, 2014
Ignore Zeros when Finding the Average
Ignore Zeros when Finding the Average
© Ted French

While the AVERAGE Function is very useful when it comes to finding the arithmetic mean for a range of data, it does have limitations.

For example, if you want to exclude certain data from the data that throws off the average - such as zero values - the AVERAGE function can't do it.

Fortunately, Excel has another function that can handle specific situations such as ignoring zero values when finding the average - it's called AVERAGEIF.

By allowing the user to set conditions on what data gets averaged, this function can easily accommodate this type of situation.

To find out all the details, read this short tutorial on Ignore Zeros when Finding the Average.

Related Tutorials

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